Improving indoor air quality in EU schools

06-02-2015

 

SINPHONIE, an EU-funded research project on indoor air quality in EU schools, and its impact on children's health, has recently published its conclusions. Based on the evidence gathered, the Joint Research Centre and the partners developed guidelines for maintaining good air quality. They are expected to contribute to healthier school environments in Europe.

Why is indoor air quality important to address in schools?

On school days, over 64 million European students and almost 4.5 million teachers are affected by the quality of the air they breathe inside their schools. Asthmatic people are particularly sensitive to poor air quality and pollutants.

How can indoor air quality in EU schools be improved?

Indoor air quality in school buildings is affected by outdoor air pollution, building characteristics and operation and management practices, including cleaning, maintenance, and ventilation.

 

Based on the findings, the report states that in order to guarantee good air quality in schools, attention needs to be paid to ventilation and occupation densities.

Guidelines on indoor air quality

Specific guidelines were developed to promote a cost-effective preventive approach to indoor air quality control.

 

The guidelines are intended to complement the already existing efforts at national and local level. They are directed at policy-makers and local authorities, who are able to undertake actions but they can also support construction companies, school staff, children and their parents in their aim to make our schools healthier.

 

Learn more about the report and guidelines in the European Commission website

 

Related links